Business

Weekly News July 15th

South Sligo Summer School – The 33rd South Sligo Summer School is now in full swing with Classes running daily and nightly music sessions in town in the pubs.. A good week of lively entertainment guaranteed so if you have friends at home bring them in for an evening of entertainments.  Full details on the website www.sssschool.org

Sensory Biodiversity Walk A very interesting Sensory,Biodiversity walk for visitors and locals alike, takes place this week under the leadership of local nature expert Martina Killian.  Enjoy the views of the Ox Mountains and Clooneen and Tullycusheen Bogs, listen to the sounds of nature, smell the flowers, taste the herbs and feel the moss under your feet.  Discover the diverse vegetation of marshy land 3 miles outside Tubbercurrry.  Takes place this Thursday 18th July at 5pm, meet at the Tubbercurry town square under the clock.  Herbal tea and homemade cake after the walk.  Admission free.

New Shop  A new shop premises has opened on Teeling Street, Tubbercurry called Digi-Telly.  This is a supplier of services to the Television and associated equipment, including satellite dishes, cables etc.  Owned and run by Max Jaago, Max has been providing this service for the last 10 years since he moved to Ireland.  Due to providing and excellent service, business has expanded, thus the need for a dedicated shop premises which is located beside the Computer Shop.  Max can be contacted at the shop if you are seeking TV upgrades or improvements.   

Social Dancing continues in the Ox Mountain Heritage Centre on Saturday July 27th at 10 O’Clock. Music by Medicine Bow, back by popular demand. Admission is €10, great nights dancing is assured,  

Oliver Brennan, Moylough  The recent death occurred of Oliver Brennan, late of Chimney Park, Moylough, Tubbercurrry.  Aged just 80, Oliver was a young at heart 80 year old who was always active and had an interest in his farm until his death. Just days before his death he spoke of getting his hay cut at the beginning of July.  Oliver was a native of Moylough who farmed the family holding since the death of his parents.  He was a dairy farmer most of his life but changed his system to suckling & dry stock in recent years.  He always had an interest in local happenings and events and had a genuine interest in the progress of neighbours and their children through their school and work activities.  He could discuss and debate politics, sport and farming affairs with anybody and liked to come to Tubbercurry a few evenings a week for a social drink and to meet the many people who knew him.  In recent years he had health challenges which he just considered a nuisance, interrupting his work schedule.  He never complained or felt sorry for himself.   His remains reposed at St. Theresa’s Funeral Home, Curry, where many hundreds called to pay their respects.  Funeral mass was held in St. Patrick’s church Moylough and burial took place in Rhue Cemetary.  Oliver was pre-deceased by his brother Sean and sisters Anne, Millie & Patricia and is survived by his sister Carmel Groarke (Bellaghy, Charlestown), sister in law Maura, nieces, nephews, grand-nieces & nephews, cousins and many friends, all to whom sympathy is extended.  May he rest gently in Peace.

Sam Bainbridge, Clooneen, Tubbercurry.  The recent death occurred of Sam (Steven) Bainbridge late of Clooneen, Tubbercurry.  In his mid 70’s, Sam was a native of Cumbria in England but moved to Tubbercurry about 20 years ago.  A stone mason by trade, Sam worked throughout the West of Ireland since moving here and created many beautiful stone features in and around houses through his expert trade.  As well as working, Sam liked to play golf, and his social life resolved around the Golf Club and Society outings.  His remains reposed at the Morahan Funeral Home Tubbercurry where a large number of friends and acquaintances called to pay their respects to a man who became a friend to many.  Sam is survived by his wife Margaret, daughter Claire & 2 grandchildren, as well as sister, brothers, in laws & extended family, all to whom sympathy is extended.  May he rest in Peace.

Brendan Walsh, Curry.  The recent unexpected death occurred after a brief illness of Brendan Walsh of Curry Village.  In his mid 70’s Brendan was a well known and multi talented musician who played the length & breath of Ireland with various Ceili and Social dancing bands over the last 50 years.  Bands he played with included The Malachy Doyle Ceili Band, The Fab Five Showband, The Fiesta Showband, Western Dixie Flyers Showband, Tenessee Sound, Rodeo, San Bernadino, Alberta Bound as well as his first love the St. Marys Ceili Band from Curry.  Brendan had an array of instruments to play including the button accordion, keyboards, tin whistle, concert flute, mouth organ, guitar, fiddle and drums.  As well as playing music, he was also a building contractor and a farmer and loved all his occupations equally.    A soft spoken and gentle human being, Brendan couldn’t offend anybody even if he tried, and anybody that knew him were touched by his gentleness.  His remains reposed at his home in Curry where many thousand called to pay their last respects to a true gentleman.  Funeral Mass took place in the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Curry and burial took place in Bunnacranagh Cemetery.  Brendan is survived by his wife Margaret, children Brendan, Eithne, Phillip, Enda and Declan, brother Padraic (London) sister Theresa in Sligo, in laws, grandchildren, nephews, nieces & relations, all to whom sympathy is extended.  May his gentle soul rest in musical Peace.

Bridie Kirrance, Carrentubber.   The recent peaceful death occurred of Bridie Kirrance ( nee Scanlon) late of Carrentubber, Tubbercurry – Aged 83, Bridie was a native of Carrentubber and was one of 5 Scanlon sisters in the family.  In her young working life she worked in Basta and actually started working there on the day it opened in 1955 as a young 20 year old.   She met her husband Michael James through work in Basta where he also worked and they married in 1964.  Bridie had a great love of farming and after she and Michael James took over the family farm in Carrentubber she always took an interest in its workings.  Michael James passed away 18 months before Bridie.  Bridie’s remains reposed at her home in Carrentubber and funeral Mass was held at the Church of St. John Evangelist, Tubbercurry prior to burial in Rhue Cemetery.   She is survived by her son David (Carrentubber) daughters Mary Henry (Oughambaun), Nora (Dublin), Michaela (Dublin) & Assumpta (Kinnegad), Sons & Daughter in laws, grand-children, sisters Mary, Winnie, Ann, Kathleen, inlaws, nephews, nieces, cousins & friends all to whom sympathy is extended.  May she rest in peace.

Moy River House Concert  A house concert featuring three singer song writers will take place at Moy River Folk Club in Cloonacool on Saturday 20th July next. Gary Ferguson, Johnny Tanner and Roy Thompson, visit the south Sligo venue as part of their current Irish tour. Booking on 087 2512030.

Tubbercurry Bridge Club  Tubbercurry Bridge Club is in the process of introducing a computerised scoring system that will eradicate the need for pen and paper.  The new software will produce final results within seconds of the evenings play being completed.  The club would like to extend thanks to The Leader Rural Development Programme, Sligo Local Community Development Committee, Sligo County Council & Co., and Sligo Leader Partnership CLG – in particular Shona Heffernan.  Without their valued support and financial aid, the purchase of this system would not have been possible. The Bridge Club meet every Thursday evening at The May Queen, Tubbercurry. Prospective new members and guests are always welcome.  Contact Colm on 087-2313631 or Mike on 071 9181830 for further details and information on beginners classes.

Tubbercurry Active Retirement Group   Tubbercurry Active Retirement Association has ceased activities for the summer months except for our Book club that will continue to meet on the last Wednesday of each month at 3.30 pm in the Library.  The book chosen for this month is Bernard McLaverty’s ‘Midwinter Break’.  The month of June was a very enjoyable one for us as we had a great week’s holiday in Northern Ireland, based in Derry and to continue celebrations for our 25th Anniversary year, travelled to Harvey’s Point Hotel, Donegal for one of their famous Dinner and Cabaret Nights.  Celebrations will continue in the Autumn when we will be launching our Book 4 of The Way That It Was’ series, this time dealing with what life was like in this area in our grandparent’s time from the mid 1900s to the early years of the 20th century – a mixture of history stories, poems and interesting articles.  [A One-day Pilgrimage to Lough Derg is being organised for Tuesday, September 10th]

MOYLOUGH 1997  A DVD rolling back the year 1997 in Moylough is now on sale for €15 in Surlis’s Supervalu, K & B Hardware and from Tom Walsh at 0872276628.  Proceeds are in aid of Aine Durkin’s volunteer work in Kisuzi Hospital in Uganda.  Past pupils of Moylough school who left  in June 1997 and those who started school  in September 1997 are featured along with excerpts from the Christmas Concert and Santa visiting the school.

Tubbercurry Family Resource Centre

Mother Baby Group

The mother baby group meets in the FRC every Wednesday from 10.30am. The group is informal and mums come for a chat and a cuppa. On occasion activities take place or guest speakers are invited to talk to the group on topics of interest. A warm welcome awaits.

Tubbercurry Card Game

Single Hand 25 card game takes place in St. Brigid’s Hall, Tubbercurry every Sunday night at 8.30pm.  All are welcome.

Banada Abbey Bingo

Massive €1,800 guaranteed payout every Tuesday night at Banada Abbey Bingo starting at 8.30pm sharp.  Jackpot,  €1,100 + on 45 calls or less.   All lines €20 and €260 payout on Flier sheet. 50:50 draw and lots of Lucky Number Games.

Tubbercurry Dance Class on Sligo Rd. Why not join our class Wednesday nights from 8pm. Class for beginners- improvers, learn new steps or practice your dancing, and a brilliant way to exercise. Slow Waltz, Waltz Foxtrot, Quickstep and more.  For more information contact  087-6674561.

Correspondent: Roger McCarrick –   tubbercurrynotes@eircom.net

GROWREMOTE , AN CHROI TUBBERCURRY ( JULY 18 )

What *exactly* is remote work, and how can that help us and our communities?

We’re running a workshop on July 18th in An Chroi, Tubbercurry to answer all of your questions. It’s led by Shauna Moran and will be bringing remote work back to basics.

Come along.

see here: https://www.changex.org/…/workshop-how-to-find-a-remote-car…

 

 

 

Weekly News July 7th

“Stand-By, Rolling,  Camera, Action”   These were the instructions being heard on the streets of Tubbercurry last week as scenes from the BBC adaption of Sally Rooney’s award winning novel “Normal People” was being filmed in various locations around the town.  Nathy Brenna’s Bar on Teeling Street was used for pub scenes, and while the general area baked in glorious sunshine, there was a prolonged shower in front of Burkes Garage which fortunately could be switched on and off as required for another scene.  A nightclub set was constructed aside St. Brigid’s Hall and filming took place late into the night on Wednesday for this particular scene.  Members of the Phoenix Players back stage crew, Peter Molloy, Mickey Curran and Joe Corscadden were on hand to help dismantle the set after filming was completed.  St. Brigid’s Hall provided catering and costume changes for the numerous extras being used.  Some of the local actors used as extras included, Peadar and Mairead Conway, Belinda Luma, Kelly Doyle and Tom Walsh. Tubbercurry was selected as one of the prime locations for the 12 part TV Series as part of the story is based in a small West of Ireland rural town.  The Director is Lenny Abramson who also directed “Garage” and the Oscar winning “Room”.  Although cast and crew have now moved on to other locations, they will be returning to film more scenes in Tubbercurry in September, so hopefully we will se more “Camera, Lights and “Action”

Tubbercurry Active Retirement Group  has ceased activities for the summer months except for our Book club that will continue to meet on the last Wednesday of each month at 3.30 pm in the Library.  The book chosen for this month is Bernard McLaverty’s ‘Midwinter Break’.  The month of June was a very enjoyable one for us as we had a great week’s holiday in Northern Ireland, based in Derry and to continue celebrations for our 25th Anniversary year, travelled to Harvey’s Point Hotel, Donegal for one of their famous Dinner and Cabaret Nights.  Celebrations will continue in the Autumn when we will be launching our Book 4 of The Way That It Was’ series, this time dealing with what life was like in this area in our grandparent’s time from the mid 1900s to the early years of the 20th century – a mixture of history stories, poems and interesting articles.  [A One-day Pilgrimage to Lough Derg is being organised for Tuesday, September 10th]

33rd South Sligo Summer School  of Traditional Music, Song and Dance will take place this year from Sunday 14th to Saturday 20th July.  Enquiries and bookings are coming in from near and far and are well up on last year at this stage.  A number of intending visitors and summer school participants have been in touch with the committee members to say that they are finding it difficult to find accommodation and so we appeal to people in Tubbercurry and the surrounding area to consider making rooms available for summer school participants.  Single rooms are especially in demand as well as double and family rooms/houses.  An accommodation list is made available to summer school participants and visitors to Tubbercurry for the week on our website www.sssschool.org, and if you wish to add your available accommodation to this list please get in touch with Nuala at the Tourist Office on Humbert Street as soon as possible.  Alternatively, ring 087-0936616, 071-9120912 or 087-9556468 and we will put you in touch with individuals/couples/families seeking accommodation.

Tubbercurry Bridge Club  – Tubbercurry Bridge Club is in the process of introducing a computerised scoring system that will eradicate the need for pen and paper.  The new software will produce final results within seconds of the evenings play being completed.  The club would like to extend thanks to The Leader Rural Development Programme, Sligo Local Community Development Committee, Sligo County Council & Co., and Sligo Leader Partnership CLG – in particular Shona Heffernan.  Without their valued support and financial aid, the purchase of this system would not have been possible. The Bridge Club meet every Thursday evening at The May Queen, Tubbercurry. Prospective new members and guests are always welcome.  Contact Colm on 087-2313631 or Mike on 071 9181830 for further details and information on beginners classes.

Tubber Masters Society Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club – Monday the 12th August 2019 One of the Oldest Golf Societies operating in Connacht continues its Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club on Monday the 12th August 2019.  The Tubbercurry Golf Outing to Enniscrone has been in existence for well over 40 years and traditionally has always played on the second Monday in August at Enniscrone Golf Club.  For 35 years of its long existence the Outing was sponsored by The Gillespie Family of Tubbercurry and many great days were had by The Society with many a story to be told.  The Gillespie Cup was formally retired in August 2017 but The Society Outing continues under its new brand name of The Tubber Masters Society.  Last year’s event was as popular as ever with a large turnout of Golfers attending The Annual Outing in Ennisrone.  While the Society is intrinsically linked to Tubbercurry Golf Club and all Members of The Society the Outing is open to anyone who has a connection with Tubbercurry or its environs.  The day is a huge social occasion where people from the locality can renew old acquaintances and make new friends.  You should pencil this date in your diary and the time sheet will be operated once again by John Gillespie who has done trogon work over the years for the Society.  John’s contact numbers are 071 91 85051 and 087 2885980 and you can contact him to get your place on the time sheet.  Looking forward to seeing all our old friends and hopefully new friends on the second Monday in August in Enniscrone.

MOYLOUGH 1997  A DVD rolling back the year 1997 in Moylough is now on sale for €15 in Surlis’s Supervalu, K & B Hardware and from Tom Walsh at 0872276628.  Proceeds are in aid of Aine Durkin’s volunteer work in Kisuzi Hospital in Uganda.  Past pupils of Moylough school who left  in June 1997 and those who started school  in September 1997 are featured along with excerpts from the Christmas Concert and Santa visiting the school

Labhair Gaeilge Linn  A local group plan to meet every Wednesday at 11am for Irish Conversation over “Cupán Tae” in Killoran’s, Tubbercurry.  No great proficiency in Irish required.  Just a fun morning for anyone interested in keeping our Heritage alive

Tubbercurry Family Resource Centre

Mother Baby Group  The mother baby group meets in the FRC every Wednesday from 10.30am. The group is informal and mums come for a chat and a cuppa. On occasion activities take place or guest speakers are invited to talk to the group on topics of interest. A warm welcome awaits

Tubbercurry Card Game  Single Hand 25 card game takes place in St. Brigid’s Hall, Tubbercurry every Sunday night at 8.30pm.  All are welcome.

Banada Abbey Bingo  Massive €1,800 guaranteed payout every Tuesday night at Banada Abbey Bingo starting at 8.30pm sharp.  Jackpot,  €1,100 + on 45 calls or less.   All lines €20 and €260 payout on Flier sheet. 50:50 draw and lots of Lucky Number Games.

Tubbercurry Dance Class on Sligo Rd. Why not join our class Wednesday nights from 8pm. Class for beginners- improvers, learn new steps or practice your dancing, and a brilliant way to exercise. Slow Waltz, Waltz Foxtrot, Quickstep and more.  For more information contact.  087-6674561.

Correspondent: Roger McCarrick –   tubbercurrynotes@eircom.net

 

 

Sligo calling: Why Dublin isn’t the ‘only show in town’ ( SILICONREPUBLIC)

LiveTiles’ Elaine Murphy on riding the wave of digital transformation and why more people should be looking west for talent.

Elaine Murphy is EMEA general manager at LiveTiles, which specialises in drag-and-drop technology so businesses can create bots, dashboards, portals or corporate intranets, with personalised AI and analytics features.

Now based in Sligo, Murphy has held multiple leadership roles in the tech space in recent years, including site lead at EA Games in Galway. She was included in the 2017 Women’s Leadership Forum at Harvard Business School and is on the board of the American Chamber of Commerce.

‘With some of our main cities overheating and hitting high occupancy rates, we are starting to see people look west’
– ELAINE MURPHY

Describe your role and what you do.

I’m the general manager for LiveTiles in EMEA. I’m responsible for leading our talented teams in the region (development, marketing, sales and IT), nurturing our EMEA customers and driving business development.

I also represent LiveTiles on external boards such as the American Chamber of Commerce, which has garnered a great reputation for advocating on behalf of American companies in Ireland and the Sligo-Leitrim ICT cluster, which promotes working and studying in our region, and aims to enhance collaboration between industry and the local education and training bodies.

How do you prioritise and organise your working life?

I prioritise the team; I focus on enabling team members, removing any barriers hindering them and facilitating growth opportunities for them. I also aim to make myself available and treat listening to understand as a priority.

I always have a ‘to-do’ list that I regularly reprioritise. It’s pointless having a long list of tasks to do for the day if you miss the real priorities by not aligning them with company’s objectives. LiveTiles is in a hyper-growth stage, so demand for my attention is high and trying to be on top of everything just isn’t going to happen. I’m honest with the team about when priorities are shifting that will impact them, as well as where my key focuses lie and the impact it has strategically if I spend a lot of time in the weeds.

What are the biggest challenges facing your sector and how are you tackling them?

A challenge that I have placed quite a bit of focus on is getting the word out about Sligo and the north-west as a place where the right talent can do some of their best work with some amazing companies. I refer to both nationals and non-nationals who have never visited the north-west or maybe see Dublin as the only show in town. With some of our main cities overheating and hitting high occupancy rates, we are starting to see people look west, but there is still much work for all of us to do to ensure the north-west is seen as an attractive option – not just for a fantastic quality of life (no commute!) but also for the opportunity to work in cutting-edge tech without having to pay exorbitant rents.

Much of our market is in the UK and we are beginning to see nervousness around Brexit as an emerging challenge. Many of our prospective public sector clients in the UK, for instance, are holding off on taking any procurement decisions due to the uncertainty created by Brexit. It remains to be seen how this will evolve as a real business risk, but I am spending more time Brexit-watching than I had planned for!

Another major challenge is to attract female talent. ICT and tech as a choice for work or study is worryingly undersubscribed by women. We really need to find ways to achieve greater representation, inclusion and equality in the tech sector but, to be honest, we are all failing at this right now … I’m using public platforms to talk about the issue, opening LiveTiles up to school visits, offering work placements to showcase that tech is all-encompassing and not necessarily all about coding, and that women like me – who didn’t enter via a traditional route with a tech qualification – can be successful and have a rewarding career.

What are the key sector opportunities youre capitalising on?

We are all riding the wave of digital transformation, which is an incredibly exciting time for our industry. Digital transformation is possible because of new technologies such as the internet of things and artificial intelligence, but ultimately it is about people. Our suite of cobots (collaborative chatbots) will work 24/7 on time-consuming tasks, empowering employees to be more creative and collaborative, as well as making more time for human connections.

Work doesn’t need to suck. Work is a pivotal part of all our identities, and at LiveTiles we have a passion to make work wonderful and use tech in a way that enables us to focus on the most productive aspects of our work, and to make better use of our precious time so we can live life to the fullest.

What set you on the road to where you are now?

I attained a bachelor’s and master’s degree in business studies from the National University of Ireland Galway and the Institute of Technology Sligo, respectively.

I made plenty of lateral and horizontal moves over the years, despite not necessarily possessing all the answers or having the specific experience. I focused on enabling the teams for success, challenging the status quo and encouraging teams to embrace technology that would reduce mundane tasks. My experience across multiple disciplines in spearheading many culture-related initiatives and my interest in the future of technology led me to this exciting and enjoyable role I am in today with LiveTiles.

What was your biggest mistake and what did you learn from it?

Early on in my career, I didn’t invest the time to understand my value prop and the type of businesses and leaders that I wanted to work with. In the early days, I sought mentorship from my bosses and, while it’s a natural person to turn to, your boss can often not be the best mentor and I found that it sometimes complicated the working relationship. I quickly learned that I was good at cultivating relationships with a wide variety of people across the business, and I developed mentoring criteria and asked different people to mentor me in different areas, and that yielded far better results for me. My advice is to explore your options and look all around the organisational structure. Your mentors don’t have to be senior to you.

How do you get the best out of your team?

I listen to understand, I applaud behaviours and performance, and I promote the fact that feedback is a gift – and I give it and seek it regularly. I set expectations and success criteria on any projects outside the day-to-day tasks, and I ensure that the environment is an open and forward-thinking one and that we talk about challenges along the way. I champion that we should always try new things to remain effective and relevant, so I build a culture that enables creativity and experimentation and where failure is not feared. I view fast failure as a natural consequence of developing for the future with a growth mindset.

‘Work doesn’t need to suck’
– ELAINE MURPHY

I recognise that having noses to the grindstone all day, every day, is unhealthy and can breed negativity, so I ensure we have lots of fun, too. We even have a team member that has responsibilities under a ‘chief fun officer’ role. We regularly enjoy team-building activities and we take the time to get to know each other so that that work at LiveTiles is enjoyable.

STEM sectors receive a lot of criticism for a lack of diversity in terms of gender, ethnicity and other demographics. Have you noticed a diversity problem in your sector? What are your thoughts on this and whats needed to be more inclusive?

The criticism is deserved, and I believe we need to collectively tackle this issue as a matter of urgency. The challenge is well known but the diagnosis and solutions are less straightforward. This needs a multistakeholder approach including students, parents, teachers, universities, education agencies and, of course, industry.

In our own case we have a very disproportionate gender balance, which we are very aware of, but we receive very few qualified female applicants. In some instances, we received zero female applicants, which means in the short term our hands are tied. Here in the north-west we have teamed up with schools, higher-level institutes and local tech companies to spread awareness and to promote tech as a rewarding career for girls and women. We aim to succeed in this, but results will not happen overnight.

Who is your role model and why?

This is a tough one – I really don’t have one individual. I enjoy reading about women who didn’t take a traditional route into the tech world but have risen to be hugely influential and have leveraged their influence in tech to help others. I also enjoy reading about unsung heroes such as Carol Shaw, who is behind some of the best graphics in retro video games. She is considered the first female video game designer and programmer, and was with Atari in the early days.

I enjoy being around problem-solvers and I’m fascinated with how decisions get derailed, how people deal with failure and how women overcome adversity in male-dominated industries. For anyone that hasn’t read or heard about Stephanie (aka Steve) Shirley, her story is inspiring. She took lots of risks in her career and has helped pave the way for others by breaking through the glass ceiling that limits women’s career growth, and she never gave up despite many setbacks and difficulties.

What books have you read that you would recommend?

I’m veering more and more towards articles and podcasts than books recently, and that’s because of time constraints and wanting to get to the end in a timely manner! A book that I refer back to and have reread recently is Originals by Adam Grant. It’s full of interesting studies and stories spanning multiple industries including sports, politics and entertainment. It provides tips from diverse topics around parents and teachers and how they can nurture originality in children, to how leaders can fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent. I find it satisfying to read triumphs around the rejection of conformity and improving the status quo.

What are the essential tools and resources that get you through the working week?

We use a mixed environment of tools here. Some of us are using Surface Books, others are using Macs. LiveTiles is heavily invested in the Office 365 suite, so we are heavy users of Microsoft Cloud services, and we use Teams and Yammer for communication. All of these have great mobile versions, which is crucial.

Our intranet pulls all the internal comms and resources together seamlessly and is a critical platform for collaboration across our organisation. For this, we walk the talk and use our flagship product, which is LiveTiles Designer, with multiple add-on tiles and chatbot integrations. Git is our source control. And Spotify provides the playlist!

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Weekly News June 22nd

A word of thanks from the Blood Donation Clinic.   There was a record turnout at St. Brigid’s Hall on Tuesday, 18 June last and all who registered to donate blood must be congratulated. There is great appreciation also of the many who publicised the event, encouraged others to donate and helped in any way make this clinic a great success. When someone gives blood they give someone who desperately needs support, another birthday, another anniversary, another day at the beach, another night under the stars, another talk with a friend, another laugh, another hug, another chance. Giving blood is giving life. 

33rd South Sligo Summer School
The 33rd South Sligo Summer School of Traditional Music, Song and Dance will take place this year from Sunday 14th to Saturday 20th July.  Enquiries and bookings are coming in from near and far and are well up on last year at this stage.  A number of intending visitors and summer school participants have been in touch with the committee members to say that they are finding it difficult to find accommodation and so we appeal to people in Tubbercurry and the surrounding area to consider making rooms available for summer school participants.  Single rooms are especially in demand as well as double and family rooms/houses.  An accommodation list is made available to summer school participants and visitors to Tubbercurry for the week on our websitewww.sssschool.org, and if you wish to add your available accommodation to this list please get in touch with Nuala at the Tourist Office on Humbert Street as soon as possible.  Alternatively, ring 087-0936616, 071-9120912 or 087-9556468 and we will put you in touch with individuals/couples/families seeking accommodation.

Peggy Owens, Banada The recent death occurred of Peggy Owens (Nee McVann) late of Banada, Tourlestrane.  In her mid 70’s, Peggy was a lovely outgoing person who would always do her best to help those that required help.  Born and reared in the neighbouring townland of Gortermone, Peggy moved just a mile down the road on her marriage to her husband Sean in the mid 60’s.  Over the next 50 years while rearing her family, Peggy did a huge amount of work for the Banada and Tourlestrane Communities, especially through the work of the Banada Development Association.  She was also keenly interested in the farming activities of her husband Sean, and she made sure that the paperwork was always in order for their renowned Pedigree Herd of Charolais cattle.  The elderly of the Tourlestrane Parish were especially cared for by Peggy, as she cared for her own mother for many years at that time.  Family was always important to here and she was niece of the late Owen B Hunt, after whom the GAA Senior Championship Cup is named.  She always thought of others before she thought of herself.    Over the last few years Peggy had health challenges, but she never complained.  Her remains reposed at the Coen’s Funeral Home prior to removal to St. Attractas Church, Tourlestrane and burial took place in Rhue Cemetary.  Peggy is survived by her beloved husband Sean and children Mairead, Caitriona, Finnian and Seadna, daughters & son in law, grand-children, relatives, neighbours, & many friends, all to whom sympathy is extended.  May she rest gently in Peace.

Brendan Connolly, Chaffpool   The recent peaceful death occurred of Brendan Connolly, late of Carrowkeel, Chaffpool, Tubbercurry, surrounded by his family.  Aged 92, Brendan was a very well known and respected man of the community having worked most of his working life on the staff of Sligo County Council.  He was a quiet spoken man who ensured jobs got done efficiently and without fuss.  After his retirement from the Council, he continued to run his farm at Chaffpool and kept an interest in the stock on the farm even through his last years.  He had a vast knowledge of the locality and its people which he willingly shared with others as required.  He also had a keen interest in the sporting and academic success of his grand-children as they came on the scene.  Brendan was pre-deceased by his wife Bridgie, their daughter Catherine and her husband Gary, as well as his daughter in law Bridget.  His remains reposed at his home in Chaffpool and at the Morahan Funeral Home, where many hundreds called to pay their respects and sympathy with the family.  Funeral Mass was in St. Nathy’s Church Achonry and burial took place in Achonry Cemetery.  Brendan is survived by his son Gerry, daughters Bernadette Cunningham (Ballymoe) Marie O’Hara (Tullinaglug)  Breege Walsh (Chaffpool) and Lennie McVeigh (Carrowmore, Sligo) sons in law, 24 grand-children, 10 great grand-children, sister Lennie (U.S.A.), nephews, nieces and friends, all of whom sympathy is extended.  May he rest in Peace.

Bernie Kirrane, Tourlestrane  The recent death occurred of Bernie Kirrane, late of Gortermone, Tourlestrane.  In his early 80’s Bernie had some health challenges, but his death was unexpected.  Born and reared in Gortermone,  Bernie took over the home farm and worked for many years with Sligo Co. Council, being  involved in the water supply section of the Council.  Socially, Bernie was a keen player of 25 Card game.  He and his wife Mary Ellen has 6 daughters and he was very proud of each and every one of them.  His remains reposed at the Coen Funeral Home prior to removal to St. Attractas Church, Tourlestrane for funeral Mass, and burial took place in Rhue Cemetery.  Bernie is survived by his beloved wife Mary Ellen, daughters Caroline, Bernadette, Geraldine, Loretta, Martina and Joanne, sister Mary, sons in law, grand-children, nieces & nephews & extended family, all to whom sympathy is extended.  May he rest in Peace.

Tubber Masters Society Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club – Monday the 12th August 2019

One of the Oldest Golf Societies operating in Connacht continues its Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club on Monday the 12thAugust 2019.  The Tubbercurry Golf Outing to Enniscrone has been in existence for well over 40 years and traditionally has always played on the second Monday in August at Enniscrone Golf Club.  For 35 years of its long existence the Outing was sponsored by The Gillespie Family of Tubbercurry and many great days were had by The Society with many a story to be told.  The Gillespie Cup was formally retired in August 2017 but The Society Outing continues under its new brand name of The Tubber Masters Society.  Last year’s event was as popular as ever with a large turnout of Golfers attending The Annual Outing in Ennisrone.  While the Society is intrinsically linked to Tubbercurry Golf Club and all Members of The Society the Outing is open to anyone who has a connection with Tubbercurry or its environs.  The day is a huge social occasion where people from the locality can renew old acquaintances and make new friends.  You should pencil this date in your diary and the time sheet will be operated once again by John Gillespie who has done trogon work over the years for the Society.  John’s contact numbers are 071 91 85051 and 087 2885980 and you can contact him to get your place on the time sheet.  Looking forward to seeing all our old friends and hopefully new friends on the second Monday in August in Enniscrone.

Tubbercurry Active Retirement Group  The usual Tuesday meetings and exercise activities continue for June and our Book Club choice of reading for this month is ‘Tangleweed And Brine’ by Deirdre Sullivan. Our thanks are due to the local branch of the County Library for providing these books for us each month.

MOYLOUGH 1997  A DVD rolling back the year 1997 in Moylough is now on sale for €15 in Surlis’s Supervalu, K & B Hardware and from Tom Walsh at 0872276628.  Proceeds are in aid of Aine Durkin’s volunteer work in Kisuzi Hospital in Uganda.  Past pupils of Moylough school who left  in June 1997 and those who started school  in September 1997 are featured along with excerpts from the Christmas Concert and Santa visiting the school.

Kempton Male Voice Choir  The Kempton male voice choir from the Diocese of Augsburg Germany will perform in St Patricks Church Moylough on Friday 28thJune starting at 7pm. It is hoped that a large congregation will turn up to greet the visiting singers as this is a major honour for the community. Tickets cost €10 and will go on sale and can be booked by contacting 0868806482.  Light refreshments will be served in Moylough Arts and Heritage Centre afterwards. This event will be part funded by the community and voluntary grant scheme funded by Sligo Co. Co and proceeds will be donated to nominated charities.

Labhair Gaeilge Linn  A local group plan to meet every Wednesday at 11am for Irish Conversation over “Cupán Tae” in Killoran’s, Tubbercurry.  No great proficiency in Irish required.  Just a fun morning for anyone interested in keeping our Heritage alive.

Tubbercurry Family Resource Centre

Mother Baby Group  The mother baby group meets in the FRC every Wednesday from 10.30am. The group is informal and mums come for a chat and a cuppa. On occasion activities take place or guest speakers are invited to talk to the group on topics of interest. A warm welcome awaits.

Tubbercurry Card Game  Single Hand 25 card game takes place in St. Brigid’s Hall, Tubbercurry every Sunday night at 8.30pm.  All are welcome.

Banada Abbey Bingo  Massive €1,800 guaranteed payout every Tuesday night at Banada Abbey Bingo starting at 8.30pm sharp.  Jackpot,  €1,100 + on 45 calls or less.   All lines €20 and €260 payout on Flier sheet. 50:50 draw and lots of Lucky Number Games.

Tubbercurry Dance Class on Sligo Rd. Why not join our class Wednesday nights from 8pm. Class for beginners- improvers, learn new steps or practice your dancing, and a brilliant way to exercise. Slow Waltz, Waltz Foxtrot, Quickstep and more.  For more information contact.  087-6674561.

Correspondent: Roger McCarrick –   tubbercurrynotes@eircom.net

Weekly Notes 17th June

33rdSouth Sligo Summer School will take place this year from Sunday 14th to Saturday 20th July. Enquiries and bookings are coming in from near and far and are well up on last year at this stage.  A number of intending visitors and summer school participants have been in touch with the committee members to say that they are finding it difficult to find accommodation and so we appeal to people in Tubbercurry and the surrounding area to consider making rooms available for summer school participants.  Single rooms are especially in demand as well as double and family rooms/houses.  An accommodation list is made available to summer school participants and visitors to Tubbercurry for the week on our websitewww.sssschool.org, and if you wish to add your available accommodation to this list please get in touch with Nuala at the Tourist Office on Humbert Street as soon as possible.  Alternatively, ring 087-0936616, 071-9120912 or 087-9556468 and we will put you in touch with individuals/couples/families seeking accommodation.

DRIMINA N.S. will be having a 5 KM Run/Walk on Sunday 23rd June. Registration 10am – 11.30 race at 12 sharp.  Entrance fee €20 for a family, €10 for adults and €5 for under 18s. Refreshments served in the school hall afterwards.

MOYLOUGH 1997  A DVD rolling back the year 1997 in Moylough is now on sale for €15 in Surlis’s Supervalu, K & B Hardware and from Tom Walsh at 0872276628. Proceeds are in aid of Aine Durkin’s volunteer work in Kisuzi Hospital in Uganda. Past pupils of Moylough school who left  in June 1997 and those who started school  in September 1997 are featured along with excerpts from the Christmas Concert and Santa visiting the school

Tubbercurry Active Retirement Group  The usual Tuesday meetings and exercise activities continue for June and our Book Club choice of reading for this month is ‘Tangleweed And Brine’ by Deirdre Sullivan. Our thanks are due to the local branch of the County Library for providing these books for us each month.

Tubber Masters Society Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club – Monday the 12th August 2019. One of the Oldest Golf Societies operating in Connacht continues its Annual Golf Outing to Enniscrone Golf Club on Monday the 12th August 2019. The Tubbercurry Golf Outing to Enniscrone has been in existence for well over 40 years and traditionally has always played on the second Monday in August at Enniscrone Golf Club.  For 35 years of its long existence the Outing was sponsored by The Gillespie Family of Tubbercurry and many great days were had by The Society with many a story to be told.  The Gillespie Cup was formally retired in August 2017 but The Society Outing continues under its new brand name of The Tubber Masters Society.  Last year’s event was as popular as ever with a large turnout of Golfers attending The Annual Outing in Ennisrone.  While the Society is intrinsically linked to Tubbercurry Golf Club and all Members of The Society the Outing is open to anyone who has a connection with Tubbercurry or its environs.  The day is a huge social occasion where people from the locality can renew old acquaintances and make new friends.  You should pencil this date in your diary and the time sheet will be operated once again by John Gillespie who has done trojon work over the years for the Society.  John’s contact numbers are 071 91 85051 and 087 2885980 and you can contact him to get your place on the time sheet.  Looking forward to seeing all our old friends and hopefully new friends on the second Monday in August in Enniscrone.

Community Mill Café, Cloonacool All profits from the Mill Cafe, Cloonacool, taken on Saturday June 22nd will be donated to Irish Motor Neuron Disease Association.  Another good reason to come and enjoy the new community Cafe. Please support.

Kempton Male Voice Choir The Kempton male voice choir from the Diocese of Augsburg Germany will perform in St Patricks Church Moylough on Friday 28th June starting at 7pm. It is hoped that a large congregation will turn up to greet the visiting singers as this is a major honour for the community. Tickets cost €10 and will go on sale and can be booked by contacting 0868806482.  Light refreshments will be served in Moylough Arts and Heritage Centre afterwards. This event will be part funded by the community and voluntary grant scheme funded by Sligo Co. Co and proceeds will be donated to nominated charities.

NORTH WEST SIMON – Dip at Dawn in aid of NW Simon Community on Fri 21st June at 5.00am at Rosses Point beside Sligo Yacht Club.  Registration €20 online at Eventbrite/ Dip at Dawn or contact 087 7708865. There will be a short Yoga session to start, then the Dip led by Sligo Rose of Tralee Julie Patterson followed by tea/coffee at Yacht club –  this is a Dip Not a swim – Sign up today.

Labhair Gaeilge Linn  A local group plan to meet every Wednesday at 11am for Irish Conversation over “Cupán Tae” in Killoran’s, Tubbercurry.  No great proficiency in Irish required.  Just a fun morning for anyone interested in keeping our Heritage alive.

Tubbercurry Family Resource Centre  Mother Baby Group – The mother baby group meets in the FRC every Wednesday from 10.30am. The group is informal and mums come for a chat and a cuppa. On occasion activities take place or guest speakers are invited to talk to the group on topics of interest. A warm welcome awaits.

Tubbercurry Card Game – Single Hand 25 card game takes place in St. Brigid’s Hall, Tubbercurry every Sunday night at 8.30pm.  All are welcome.

Banada Abbey Bingo Massive €1,800 guaranteed payout every Tuesday night at Banada Abbey Bingo starting at 8.30pm sharp.  Jackpot,  €1,100 + on 45 calls or less.   All lines €20 and €260 payout on Flier sheet. 50:50 draw and lots of Lucky Number Games.

North West Hospice would like to thank all the volunteers who gave their time and energy throughout Sligo, Leitrim and Bundoran for our annual Sunflower Days.  A massive thank you also to everybody who donated so generously to our collections on our Sunflower Days, which took place from 6th-8th June. All funds raised during Sunflower Days are used to run the much needed service. North West Hospice appreciates your continued support.

Tubbercurry Dance Class on Sligo Rd. Why not join our class Wednesday nights from 8pm. Class for beginners- improvers, learn new steps or practice your dancing, and a brilliant way to exercise. Slow Waltz, Waltz Foxtrot, Quickstep and more.  For more information contact.  087-6674561.

Correspondent: Roger McCarrick –   tubbercurrynotes@eircom.net

Smart Community by Padraic Neary

It is entirely appropriate that the “Smart Community Initiative” was launched in Tubbercurry on Friday, 18th January, 2019 as it was in this small town that “Smart Economics” were made manifest in this country with the formation of The Tool and Gauge Company of Ireland Limited, in 1956. “Smart Economics” are underpinned by “Smart Technology”  and nowhere in Industry is technology smarter than in “Precision Toolmaking” where the equipment and machinery to produce everything in quantity is designed and manufactured. A century ago, Henry Ford described “toolmakers” as the “Aristocrats” of Engineering while Steve Jobs, when asked how he would like to be remembered, expressed the hope that he would be regarded as a good “Toolmaker” to the world.

Since the first tools of wood and stone were made, human progress has been defined by the quality, durability and “smartness” of the tools available at the time. The Industrial Revolution massively improved tooling and output which facilitated an eightfold increase of human population coupled with enormous enhancement of living conditions.  Over the last three decades, Computerization has lifted Technology and Precision Toolmaking” to unprecedented levels of excellence and performance, which are proudly embraced and perfected by native and international industry all over the country.

Increases in excellence and output have been enormous; so enormous that many conditions and balances which propelled growth economics through two centuries of Industrial revolution have been made redundant and reversed. These achievements have brought about the greatest and best time ever experienced by the human race. It is becoming apparent however, that failure to fully embrace and adapt to an entirely unprecedented era of “sufficiency” and reduced workload, is causing widespread uncertainty and insecurity for many who fear abandonment by the technological age. Such fear is at the heart of Brexit and increasing movement towards extreme politics all over the world.

Fifty-three years ago, Tubbercurry enthusiastically embraced “Smart Economics” of that time. It would be appropriate and very worthwhile if the newly instituted “Smart Community Initiative” could provide a similar reception for “Smart Economics” of the present. Sadly, such has not been the Global experience to date. It is no longer smart for Economists, politicians, media and communities to think that old remedies will cure newly arrived problems. Initiatives to improve education, entice investment, create new jobs and regular Government windfalls to sustain local enterprise, while very welcome in the immediate term, are in no way adequate to counter the enormous changes generated by modern technology.

Embracing new technologies successfully will require complete rethinking of economic ideology. The old rules no longer apply. How can growth economics serve a technological world that increasingly produces too much; thereby creating enormous difficulties for commerce and trade? How can employment, with all its benefits, entitlements and security, be sustained despite technology continually reducing reliance on human labour? How can confidence of prolonged income, through secure commercial activity and employment, be restored in a world that no longer guarantees either? How can masses be reassured that modern technology is not going to abandon them; and consign their futures to dependency, deprivation and despair? These are extraordinarily difficult questions that very few in positions of authority want to acknowledge. But they are questions that must be asked; they must be investigated, debated and answered adequately and quickly. Otherwise the horrific vista of the most successful smartest technology ever devised, destroying innumerable communities could become a reality.

The greatest service Tubbercurry, with its new status and “Smart Economy”  experience, could perform for the local community, for the national community and indeed for the global community, is to initiate a debate which starts the process of formulating an economic ideology which will get the very best out of the most successful technology ever devised.  Since the dawn of history, economic ideology, from its simplest to its most complex, had had to cope with and manage technologies which were never capable of producing enough. The world now need an ideology capable of coping with and managing technology that generates more than can be consumed. Where better could serious and sustained quest for satisfactory answers to the problems of success begin; other than in the birthplace of smart economies in Ireland. A community capable of doing such a service, could truly be called “really smart”.

 

industrialization of Tubbercurry in the mid 20th century.  Padraic Neary

Industrialization of Tubbercurry in the mid 20th century.  Padraic Neary 26/10/2017.

In the late 1930’s the first of 6 Gallagher brothers from Cashel, a village just south of Tubbercurry, departed for England seeking work and within a short time, as other brothers joined them, set up their own construction company in the city of London. They became involved in clearing bomb sites during the blitz and in rebuilding that great city after the war. By the late 1940’s they has expanded their building activities to Dublin and decided to source some essential building requirements from their home place where jobs were badly needed. Their first venture in the early 1950’s was a joint arrangement with Gowna Wood Industries to produce doors and windows for the building industry.

Very shortly afterwards they made an arrangement with a Danish Company, Basta, to commence manufacture of locks together with door and window fittings in their home town of Tubbercurry and complemented the project by including foundry facilities for production of cast iron, brass and zinc. This was one of the very first modern type industries to be established in Ireland. It soon became apparent that for Basta to operate successfully there was requirement for an engineering facility to service, repair and manufacture new tooling for production of the various parts involved. As no such expertise was available in the country at the time it was decided to set up their own facility and so The Tool and Gauge Company of Ireland came into existence. The formation of Toolmaking or, to use its more posh title, Precision engineering, was the introduction of the Smart Economy to Ireland.

Most people have little knowledge of Precision Engineering or even know of its existence. Known to some as Tool-making, it is not production of implements to facilitate tradesmen or gardeners or DIY enthusiasts but rather the core essential around which all mass production is based. Precision Engineering involves the design and manufacture of specialize equipment which is essential in the manufacture of everything which is required in quantity. Everything mass produced for the human race is possible only because of the knowledge, skill and advancement of this key section of industry. Henry Ford attributed his enormous success at mass production to “tool-making excellence” classifying toolmakers as the aristocrats of industry. Almost a century later Steve Jobs who hailed himself as a toolmaker, acknowledged that his ideas for a smart-phone would have remained ideas without the expertise of master toolmakers.

Precision Engineering is essential to and often the source from which product development springs as well as the impetus behind automation and robotics which when allied with the genius of computerization and digital control achieves extraordinary results. 

Tubbercurry, as well as retaining the successor of the original Tool and Gauge Company and Basta has given rise to a proliferation of similar operations; some retained locally, such as Avenue Precision and Laurence Engineering with many others spread throughout the whole country. It can truly be claimed that Tubbercurry as the birthplace of new Industrialization and of Precision Engineering in Ireland, has proved itself the cradle of highly Technical Industry and the original midwife of Smart Economics in this country.

When founded in Tubbercurry just over 60 years ago the “thou” was the universal unit of precision; A “thou” in Imperial measurement was one thousandth’s part of an inch; the unit of precision sought after and expected. One thousandth’s part of a millimetre is the present unit of perfection. A 25 times reduction of precision to about one fiftieth the diameter of the finest human hair is what the three industries located locally deliver, enabling them keep pace with and achieve skill and accuracy to match that of any place in the world. Each is master of modern precision and carves a niche for themselves in a multi-demanding industry which is what the smart economy is all about. It is because of such precision that many top technology companies locate in Ireland and although having just about half a centuries industrial tradition Irish Precision Engineers can match and even surpass many who have been involved in industry for three or four times as long. The Irish have an aptitude for precise technology as evidenced by the success of Precision engineering in this country. We are proud that for this country, it all started with the formation of The Tool and Gauge Company of Ireland Limited in Tubbercurry just about 60 years ago.  

Industry proved phenomenally successful in Tubbercurry and at its peak employed in excess of 600 people in this small town. Many people have trained in manufacturing over the years having very successful careers and indeed founding many industries at home and abroad. In fact two most recent Precision Toolmaking Apprentices trained in Tool and Gauge represented Ireland with distinction in International Competition. Donald Logan in 2015 competed in Brazil while Michael Flynn just returned from Abu Dhabi. The two mainstays of employment still trade successfully but at a reduced level of employment as technological advance and globalization of trade reduced and relocated many of the great manufacturing powerhouses of the world. The basic industries of Basta and Tool and Gauge coupled with several smaller highly technical and very skilled establishments bear witness to the successful industrialization of Tubbercurry in the mid 20th century and still play a significant role in the commercial fabric of the town and surrounding area. It is hoped in the near future to raise a monument in Wolf Tone Square to the beginning of Smart Irish Economics so that all may realize and remember the importance to the whole country the Industrialization of this small town in the mid 20th century.